THRILL

Meet THRILL. The newest light in the Schoone Lights collection.
The shape of the shades was designed by Kees Kamper. He used mathematics to create a shade that looks like as if it’s lingering around the chassis of the lamp. But, as can be seen in the second image from the right, this is an optical illusion.

The shades of THRILL are printed according the ‘infill only’ method. It’s base is made of recycled plastic. The 12 Volt LED light system implies: this is an energy save product.
Available at Alosery Art & Design € 595

Not available yet, just a sneak preview: BABY THRILL

Necklace

Today, Schoone lights is selling some light systems, but to break even or to earn money we have to sell more. So we are looking for shops and galleries, which want to be part of the Schoone Lights Experience.

To reach more people we also created a Schoone Lights Instagram account @schoone_lights. The idea is to use this account in the near future to sell our lamps online.

Meanwhile Kees is always looking for new experiments in 3D printing. Some time ago he was inspired by the necklaces of Brexit MP Theresa May. So, he designed & print a big beads necklace and because he will not use support in his prints, it took a while to discover a way to print the beads.

The necklace has 18 beads. To print them without support, they were designed and printed in halves. The halves were glued together. There are three different beads due to the fact Kees used the Slic3r ‘load parts’ feature to print three ‘infill only’ configurations in on print job.

Gettin’ there

Last week, Kees calibrated and tested his self-repaired Leapfrog and the robot is printing as if nothing happened.

A month ago Kees was interviewed by Bob Timroff of the Dutch tech magazine MACHINA. As an illustration with the interview Bob wanted a Steve Jobs-like picture of Kees and his Leapfrog. This could not happen because it looked like the printer was completely finished. Now it is printing great stuff again!

Bob did not need the Jobs-like picture to write a great story about the Kees Kamper 3D print adventures. It’s published in MACHINA and out now. So if you are interested in the stuff we publish: buy MACHINA 8: Bob tells the ‘infill only’ story better than we do.

An update about ‘Paternoster’. We try to sell this light system in light/interior shops, but until now they are not interested. A pity for them, but no problem for Schoone Lights because art galleries love ‘infill only’ lights. ‘Paternoster’ was already for sale at Umbria

Now you can also buy it at Oode, Singel 159A Amsterdam


And … at Alosery Art & Design Almere, you can even buy several editions of the ‘Paternoster’ light system.

Keep on truckin’

Yes, my Leapfrog Creatr 2013 is printing again.

As mentioned in my previous post, my good old printer lost control over it’s X-movements: no movement, only a very ugly, grinding noise. I did some research but could not find a software problem. To check if it was a broken motherboard, I changed the X and Y wires. The problem did not switch to the Y-axis. Conclusion: this is probably an X-motor issue.
I contacted Leapfrog and asked if they still had a spare motor available. They had one in stock and shipped it to me, without any costs. I was very happy, but not for long. The new motor did not solve the problem: still a grinding noise and no X-movement.

There were two causes left.
1: the end-stop failed or 2: the cable between the motherboard and end-stop and/or the X-motor was broken.
I contacted Leapfrog again, explained the problem and asked for spare parts. It took some time but yesterday a new end-stop and some cables arrived. Again without any costs…

Leapfrog repair kit

First I mounted the new end-stop: the problem remained. Next, I replaced the X-axis cables and suddenly my Leapfrog Creatr was back in business and I was the happiest 3D printer of the universe.

Today, I tested the printer on a ‘one perimeter spiral vase’ and an ‘infill only’ bracelet. The print quality was 100%. My Creatr back on track and I feel great, because I was able to repair it all by myself. And many thanks to Leapfrog for the spare parts. I feared my Creatr died after 5 years of intense printing, but now it is ready to start it’s 6th year as a young god in an unexpected future.

‘one perimeter’ – ‘infill only’ bracelet

what’s up?

Bad news: after five years of very intensive usage my leapfrog Dual Creatr is seriously in trouble. Suddenly it lost complete control over it’s x-movements. It does not recognise x=o, produces aggressive sounds and goes anywhere but the right x coordinates. I did some research and think the motor which drives the x-axis is broken. But I am not sure.
The question is should I invest in a five year old 3D printer? What if there are additional problems and what’s the future of an overaged Leapfrog? Conclusion to much uncertainty, so I will not invest in my senior Leapfrog.

I owe a lot to this machine: it changed my life! But it is time for something new. My Leapfrog is from 2013, which means it’s unbelievable old and nowadays there are much better 3D printers available. But it’s difficult to say goodbye, so, I give my printer one last chance by asking Leapfrog if there’s still a suited motor in stock and given the uncertainty about the status of my Creatr; do they want to sent me one for free? They did not answer this question yet.

As I said, this 3D printer changed my life. I never thought: “one day I will be selling light systems in art galleries”, but I do. Together with Gerard Schoone we are ‘Schoone Lights’ and this brand-new company is a very promising startup. In the previous post, I mentioned that some of our lights are exposed and for sale at Gallery De Hooffzaak. They still are until the 27th of January.

Good news: our top model ‘Paternoster’ is now also available at UMBRIA ART & ANTIQUES

‘Paternoster’ at ‘Umbria’

And there’s more: ‘Schoone Lights’ is also participating in CBKamer, where art and design talents present and sell their work. We show and sell three Schoone lights: ‘Paternoster’, ‘Geo’ and ‘Toorts’.

‘Schoone Lights’ at ‘CBKamer’

more about Schoone Lights https://www.instagram.com/prdcz
https://www.facebook.com/schoonelights
https://www.ceipps.nl/schoone-lights
http://schoonelights.com

Buy Schoone Lights

Schoone Lights had a wonderful time at Rotterdam Design District. In fact we were surprised by the amount of positive attention our product received. Many visitors liked what they saw, but were curious about what they were looking at. Understandable, because when you see ‘infill only’ 3D prints for the first time,  you might think: is it a kind of fabric or is it perhaps glass?
Regular 3D prints have a plastic look and feel, ‘infill only’ products are mysterious.

Some months later, at ‘MEESTERLIJK’, a 3 day event the Westergasfabriek Amsterdam (where professionals from traditional craft such as silversmiths and woodworkers together with designers and manufacturers of handmade design expose their products) we had the same experience. Many people took a closer look at our ‘infill only’ shades, but did not dare to touch them. When we told them, they could, most people were surprised. They expected very fragile material, but they experienced a strong and stiff lamp shade: nice surprise.

Important notion: Schoone Lights are environment friendly: our 3D printed parts are made of fully recyclable PET. They are printed in Haarlem and only when we need them, so no stock and almost no transport. The lights are 12 volt /1.5 Watt LED systems, which means Schoone Lights use less energy than average lights. 

Meanwhile Gerard designed some strictly metal lights. This one is called GeO:

Schoone Lights is ready to sell it’s products. For information about pricing: contact our agent Bas Meijer of ceipps.nl   Phone +31 35 6720711 or mail info@ceipps.nl
You can also contact Gerard: info@schoonelights.com for a visit at his studio.

Currently, we are exposing some Schoone lights at the Go Gallery and Galerie De Hooffzaak in Amsterdam.

This is a picture of the exposition at Galerie Hooffzaak. Schoone Lights (at the right) is a guest at the yearly light party of  Gert Merlijn (in the middle).

You can also visit our new website schoonelighs.com

Old idea, new light

In our last post we used 3D printing to create a new part to build a better version of an almost forgotten chandelier.
Gerard modified the steel rods and in this post we use the same central part to present a fully 3D printed chandelier: TRAPEZE 02

TRAPEZE 02 ©Schoone Lights 2018

The same light shades we used in our standing lights, are now building a hanging light. One can also put this light system upside down and it becomes a standing light!

Trapeze 02 is rather big, how about a smaller version?
After some adaptations of the central 3D printed part we prototyped TRAPEZE 03. To complete the Schoone Lights collection 2018 we also needed a wall light. New modifications of the central part gave birth to WALL ONE.

TRAPEZE 03 and WALL ONE ©Schoone Lights 2018

It’s amazing to see how 3D design and printing allows you to check out (prototype) your ideas in a very short time. Some years ago you needed a expensive molding service to build your prototypes. Today some 3D modelling and 3D printing do this trick faster and cheaper.

Prototyping ideas

There’s an old idea about a pendant lamp/chandelier. Gerard created it many years ago but was not happy with the design. He needed a piece that kept all parts together, and to see if this piece does the trick, he needed a prototype. 10 Years ago prototyping was much too expensive for a start-up. Today there’s 3D printing and Gerard asked Kees if he could print this:

draft ©Schoone Lights 2018

Kees opened SketchUp and started drawing. It’s a very basic shape, so it took only an hour 3D drawing time. Next, the Leapfrog 3D printer started printing and a few hours later the first prototype was ready to be tested. Gerard took it home and checked it’s functionality. Some small adjustments were needed. Kees adjusted the model and printed a new piece. This time he used a slower speed to raise the 3D print quality. That’s how this prototype became a product, ready to build the Gerard Schoone chandelier called TRAPEZE 01.

TRAPEZE 01 ©Schoone Lights 2018

Some years ago, only big companies could afford to prototype and test new ideas. At the same time, it took at least a month before the first prototype could be tested. Today anybody can prototype and test ideas, in days. That’s one of the big powers of 3D printing. The only disadvantage: mass production is not an option. But when your idea is 3D printed, tested and proven okay, you can always use mass production methods to sell it on a large scale.

TRAPEZE 01 ©Schoone Lights 2018

‘Schoone Lights’ is not aiming for mass production. We use 3D printing to build our products. Usually we go for ‘Infill Only’ 3D printing to print exclusive light shades, sometimes we use 3D printing to test and build missing links.