Prototyping ideas

There’s an old idea about a pendant lamp/chandelier. Gerard created it many years ago but was not happy with the design. He needed a piece that kept all parts together, and to see if this piece does the trick, he needed a prototype. 10 Years ago prototyping was much too expensive for a start-up. Today there’s 3D printing and Gerard asked Kees if he could print this:

draft ©Schoone Lights 2018

Kees opened SketchUp and started drawing. It’s a very basic shape, so it took only an hour 3D drawing time. Next, the Leapfrog 3D printer started printing and a few hours later the first prototype was ready to be tested. Gerard took it home and checked it’s functionality. Some small adjustments were needed. Kees adjusted the model and printed a new piece. This time he used a slower speed to raise the 3D print quality. That’s how this prototype became a product, ready to build the Gerard Schoone chandelier called TRAPEZE 01.

TRAPEZE 01 ©Schoone Lights 2018

Some years ago, only big companies could afford to prototype and test new ideas. At the same time, it took at least a month before the first prototype could be tested. Today anybody can prototype and test ideas, in days. That’s one of the big powers of 3D printing. The only disadvantage: mass production is not an option. But when your idea is 3D printed, tested and proven okay, you can always use mass production methods to sell it on a large scale.

TRAPEZE 01 ©Schoone Lights 2018

‘Schoone Lights’ is not aiming for mass production. We use 3D printing to build our products. Usually we go for ‘Infill Only’ 3D printing to print exclusive light shades, sometimes we use 3D printing to test and build missing links.

DoubleThrill

This weekend opqrstu3D designed & printed ‘DoubleThrill’… It looks very UN3DPRINTED. I am doing experiments in ‘infill only’ 3dprinting for two years and this is the print that says it all: ‘DoubleThrill’ really looks like it’s made of lace-like fabric. It’s not as thin as lace, but 0.9 mm comes close. It was a five and a half hour print job and took 12 meters white 3D4makers PETg. It’s printed at 0.3 mm layer height, 600 layers high. Bed Temp: 65 ºC, Extrusion Temp: 230 ºC. It’s almost unbelievable: infill printed at 0.9 mm thickness.
Only by going extreme opqrstu3D arrived at this point and created an awesome light:

DoubleThrill © opqrstu 2017

opqrstu3D update

Today, I realised not everybody follows Instagram. So here’s an update about opqrstu 3D design and printing activities. Not blogging saved a lot of time to design and print. I am no writer, so composing a piece like this takes about three or four hours. Last month, I used these hours to design some great new and cunning thingies.

design & 3Dprint © opqrstu 2016
design & 3Dprint © opqrstu 2016

We like to combine 2D and 3D and did another Roy Lichtenstein artwork in 3D. This is ‘Masterpiece’ and it’s awesome to see how the robot printed text, you can even recognise the font opqrstu3D used in SketchUp: comic sans! Next, 3D4makers asked the robot to test some new PET-g colours; orange and purple; it printed some wonderful and perfect infill only bracelets. We also checked out very small detail printing: a 150 mm long T-Rex:
ddb
Amazing details again, this time in 3D4makers PET-G Gold. The Xmas tree was printed because it’s the time of the year. The triplets light is printed because 12 volt LED lighting is what opqrstu3D is really about. I am still prototyping this standing light and the blog will continue and keep you informed about the future of DIY 12 Volt (save energy) light design.

raspberry pi 3D

About three years ago opqrstu3D designed it’s first light: YAN.
A week ago Nick Hall wrote on 3Dprintingindustry.com: “….The energy savings on offer with this system (KCc) are substantial and it’s such a simple idea that has been turned into reality by a man that was struggling to make his 3D printer work at all. … Now he has ironed out the bugs with his Creatr and tamed his robot, Kamper and Schoen (opqrstu) are turning into a force to be reckoned with and could take the home design world by storm.”

iBook12True words.
To fast forward this storm, I wrote an eBook about my adventures in 3D LED light printing, from YAN to JellyLight:
3D Printed Light.
It’s a free download, iPad/iBook/iMac only. Opqrstu opted for this format because of it’s great 3D widgets: you can ‘touch’ and move the models around with a fingertip. Pictures freeze an object, add a 3D render and the object is much easier to imagine in the real world. Download 3D Printed Light to experience the history of opqrstu3D light design.

 

Meanwhile, a Raspberry PI 3 was still waiting for a nice housing. Sometime ago, Creatr printed one, but this turned out to be a PI 1 or PI 2 case. Finally, I found a nice PI 3 case by Normand on Thingiverse. The robot printed it on 3D4makers transparent PET-G.
Great design and great printing: it fits perfectly around PI, no sanding, just print & fit!

RasbHere, PI 3 controls a 360º camera. On the back you see the battery, it’s bigger than the computer. Though, together they are small enough to be carried by a camera(wo)man.
A portable data storage device completes the job.

I’m thinking of using PI 3 to control Creatr 2013. At the moment, my robot has a problem:
to print, Creatr needs to be USB connected to a computer. When this computer is a PI 3 in a 3D printed housing with a TFT screen and Wi-Fi … best kept secret: at Leapfrog they are already there: their new 3D printer BOLT has a Raspberry PI 3 inside. Your computer contacts BOLT on Raspberry by Wi-Fi. You control BOLT by changing things on the Raspberry TFT screen! Meanwhile the opqrstu robot is still USB only.