THRILL

Meet THRILL. The newest light in the Schoone Lights collection.
The shape of the shades was designed by Kees Kamper. He used mathematics to create a shade that looks like as if it’s lingering around the chassis of the lamp. But, as can be seen in the second image from the right, this is an optical illusion.

The shades of THRILL are printed according the ‘infill only’ method. It’s base is made of recycled plastic. The 12 Volt LED light system implies: this is an energy save product.
Available at Alosery Art & Design € 595

Not available yet, just a sneak preview: BABY THRILL

Gettin’ there

Last week, Kees calibrated and tested his self-repaired Leapfrog and the robot is printing as if nothing happened.

A month ago Kees was interviewed by Bob Timroff of the Dutch tech magazine MACHINA. As an illustration with the interview Bob wanted a Steve Jobs-like picture of Kees and his Leapfrog. This could not happen because it looked like the printer was completely finished. Now it is printing great stuff again!

Bob did not need the Jobs-like picture to write a great story about the Kees Kamper 3D print adventures. It’s published in MACHINA and out now. So if you are interested in the stuff we publish: buy MACHINA 8: Bob tells the ‘infill only’ story better than we do.

An update about ‘Paternoster’. We try to sell this light system in light/interior shops, but until now they are not interested. A pity for them, but no problem for Schoone Lights because art galleries love ‘infill only’ lights. ‘Paternoster’ was already for sale at Umbria

Now you can also buy it at Oode, Singel 159A Amsterdam


And … at Alosery Art & Design Almere, you can even buy several editions of the ‘Paternoster’ light system.

what’s up?

Bad news: after five years of very intensive usage my leapfrog Dual Creatr is seriously in trouble. Suddenly it lost complete control over it’s x-movements. It does not recognise x=o, produces aggressive sounds and goes anywhere but the right x coordinates. I did some research and think the motor which drives the x-axis is broken. But I am not sure.
The question is should I invest in a five year old 3D printer? What if there are additional problems and what’s the future of an overaged Leapfrog? Conclusion to much uncertainty, so I will not invest in my senior Leapfrog.

I owe a lot to this machine: it changed my life! But it is time for something new. My Leapfrog is from 2013, which means it’s unbelievable old and nowadays there are much better 3D printers available. But it’s difficult to say goodbye, so, I give my printer one last chance by asking Leapfrog if there’s still a suited motor in stock and given the uncertainty about the status of my Creatr; do they want to sent me one for free? They did not answer this question yet.

As I said, this 3D printer changed my life. I never thought: “one day I will be selling light systems in art galleries”, but I do. Together with Gerard Schoone we are ‘Schoone Lights’ and this brand-new company is a very promising startup. In the previous post, I mentioned that some of our lights are exposed and for sale at Gallery De Hooffzaak. They still are until the 27th of January.

Good news: our top model ‘Paternoster’ is now also available at UMBRIA ART & ANTIQUES

‘Paternoster’ at ‘Umbria’

And there’s more: ‘Schoone Lights’ is also participating in CBKamer, where art and design talents present and sell their work. We show and sell three Schoone lights: ‘Paternoster’, ‘Geo’ and ‘Toorts’.

‘Schoone Lights’ at ‘CBKamer’

more about Schoone Lights https://www.instagram.com/prdcz
https://www.facebook.com/schoonelights
https://www.ceipps.nl/schoone-lights
http://schoonelights.com

Old idea, new light

In our last post we used 3D printing to create a new part to build a better version of an almost forgotten chandelier.
Gerard modified the steel rods and in this post we use the same central part to present a fully 3D printed chandelier: TRAPEZE 02

TRAPEZE 02 ©Schoone Lights 2018

The same light shades we used in our standing lights, are now building a hanging light. One can also put this light system upside down and it becomes a standing light!

Trapeze 02 is rather big, how about a smaller version?
After some adaptations of the central 3D printed part we prototyped TRAPEZE 03. To complete the Schoone Lights collection 2018 we also needed a wall light. New modifications of the central part gave birth to WALL ONE.

TRAPEZE 03 and WALL ONE ©Schoone Lights 2018

It’s amazing to see how 3D design and printing allows you to check out (prototype) your ideas in a very short time. Some years ago you needed a expensive molding service to build your prototypes. Today some 3D modelling and 3D printing do this trick faster and cheaper.

LED there be LIGHT

In this blog I write about my experiences in 3D design and printing. Four years ago, I got my Leapfrog Creatr and it is still printing without major problems. I am an experienced 3D printer now. This blog existed to inform people about the problems I encountered in Leapfrog 3D printing and how to solve them.

Today, I design/print daily and show the results at my Instagram account. Most problems are solved, so there’s almost no need to write about opqrstu3D print experiences anymore. BUT, there’s one small problem left: how can I earn a living with 3D printing? When I started 3D printing, the future was bright; or in the near future every household will have a 3D printer en 3D printing will rule the world. Today we know better: 3D printing is too complex to go mainstream. It’s slow and therefore too expensive for the production of ‘thingies’. Almost nobody uses 3D printing at home and in the near future this will not change.

But, nothing is impossible and this year I will try to earn a small living on building and selling 3D printed light systems. Some years ago, I met Gerard Schoone, a pioneer in 12 Volt light design. Meanwhile I invented ‘infill only’ 3D printing and today we are ready to present some revolutionary 12 volt light systems. As mentioned before, 3D printing is too slow for production, so we need more than one printer to speed up the process. Fortunately, 3D printers are getting cheaper day by day. So, in 2018 we’ll be using several printers to produce our light systems. Here’s a prototype of one of our first products. The light shades can be moved up and down. Our printers used 220 hours to print this model.

PATERNOSTER © Gerard Schoone 2018

Stay tuned for more …

FlowerLight4

Another day, another light. From the moment opqrstu3D discovered ‘Infill Only’ 3Dprinting the possibilities are endless. Especially in light design. The grainy, silky, organic, lace-like structures, the robot prints when I program it to print infill only, are matching wonderful with 12 volt LED light bulbs. As said, the possibilities are endless, but how do they look? Nobody did it before so every new design is an adventure. Luckily, there are more adventurous printers out there. Guys like Sandro Glasius and Sjaak van der Vooren also started to explore this new 3D print style. (check their experiments at Instagram)

Today I used the Lotus experiment to design a wonderful new Flower light:

FlowerLight4 © opqrstu 2017

Another un3Dprinted product at the opqrstu3D print experience: ‘Infill Only’ rules.

Lotus

3D printing allows you to design and manufacture your own lighting: create your own atmosphere by saving money and energy. An example: yesterday at noon opqrstu3D wanted to have a light based on a Lotus Flower. I opened SketchUp, started thinking and drawing …. Two hours later I was satisfied and decided to print the first prototype …. 2h:56m:28s later the robot finished it’s print job in red 3D4makers PET-G:

Lotus © opqrstu 2017

So, there was an idea and five hours later there is a product: 3Dprinting rules. Combined with other materialised ideas, this is what’s happening in the opqrstu studio today:

Lighting © opqrstu 2017

Customize a light

It’s hard to earn money in 3D printing, because 3D printing is a much too slow production method. What do you do when you do not sell products?

Well, today I upgraded an old light system. This system was made for old fashioned, environment unfriendly, light bulbs. It’s too difficult to build a 12 volt trafo in this system, so I use an energy saving 220 volt light bulb to light it. But these bulbs are a too big for this system, so I need a new light shade to dim and upgrade the ugly light of energy saving light bulbs. In SketchUp, opqrstu3D customized an earlier light shade and printed it ‘infill only’. Creatr printed a beautiful light shade on an 5 hour print job. The print turned a lost light system into a trendy and friendly energy saving light. Instead of earning money, 3D printing saves money and energy!

customized light system © opqrstu 2017