TOORTS

Ontwerp: Gerard Schoone

Het armatuur van de Toorts bestaat uit twee RVS draden (+ en -) waarvan de uiteinden zo geconstrueerd zijn dat er een conventionele gloei/LED lamp in gedraaid kan worden. Door het minimale materiaal gebruik lijken de lampen in deze ijle constructie te zweven. De armaturen zijn in hoogte verstelbaar en worden in de vier buizen van de lamp voet geplaatst. 

The lamp fixture of the Toorts is based on two steel wires (12V, + and -) of which the ends are constructed in such away that it can hold a conventional bulb. The bulbs almost seem to float in the thin minimal construction. The wires are placed in the four tubes of the square lamp base and the height of the four lamp fixtures can be adjusted. 

Materiaal/Material: Stainless steel, Trespa,
Dimmable 12V transformer with low voltage LED bulbs
Hoogte/Height 160-200 cm

Verkoopprijs/Sales Price:
Toorts € 825

Bestellen? klik om te bellen/click to call

Old idea, new light

In our last post we used 3D printing to create a new part to build a better version of an almost forgotten chandelier. Gerard modified the steel rods and in this post we use the same central part to present a fully 3D printed chandelier: TRAPEZE 02

TRAPEZE 02 ©Schoone Lights 2018

The same light shades we used in our standing lights, are now building a hanging light. One can also put this light system upside down and it becomes a standing light!

Trapeze 02 is rather big, how about a smaller version?
After some adaptations of the central 3D printed part we prototyped TRAPEZE 03. To complete the Schoone Lights collection 2018 we also needed a wall light. New modifications of the central part gave birth to WALL ONE.

TRAPEZE 03 and WALL ONE ©Schoone Lights 2018

It’s amazing to see how 3D design and printing allows you to check out (prototype) your ideas in a very short time. Some years ago you needed a expensive molding service to build your prototypes. Today some 3D modelling and 3D printing do this trick faster and cheaper.

un3Dprinted

Four years ago, I knew nothing about 3D printing. In my spare time I did some 3D drawing in SketchUp, mainly Amsterdam canal houses. I liked it to build 3D models of canal houses on Google Earth. It was not easy but I learned a lot about 3D by just doing it. Opqrstu3D knew 3D printers existed, but was not interested: too expensive and I had really no idea what to do with this machines.

Today, I am almost four years addicted to 3D printing. Life is never what you think it will be! On the Dutch Design Week 2013 there was a challenge: 3D-draw a light that can be 3D printed. I like challenges, had noting to loose, checked the internet for tutorials and started drawing. My light was one of the few printable models. Five lights were exposed at the DDW2013 and mine won the Dutch3Design Award 2013. With the award came a Leapfrog 3D printer. I was amazed and even more amazed when the machine arrived: it looked very cool, but I had no idea about how this robot would fit in my life. I never 3D printed before and knew noting about this machine and how to operate it.

It took about nine months before I controlled my Leapfrog; it was blood, sweat and even tears, but also very rewarding. Printing a photo at home, is nice, but 3D printing your own product and holding it in your hands is very special. And after every print, there’s always the question: “What shall I design and print next?” 3D printing became a life changer,  a 24/7 addiction

During the first two years, I designed and printed the usual stuff: cups and cups and vases and different vases. Very boring and certainly not a life changer. But life is never what you expect it will be, and one day my 3D printer went totally out of control and printed crap only. I tried and tried, but could not control the robot anymore, it printed crap vases and crap cups. No smooth perimeters, just bubbly surfaces. I tried changing all kind of settings  without results, I was very frustrated. Leapfrog Creatr weights 35 kilo, so I could not throw it out of my window, instead I told (Slic3r) the machine to print zero perimeters or infill only. A very stupid decision, but not that stupid after all. It was my first infill only 3D print and the moment an addiction started and my life changed. Infill only 3D printing creates an unique un3Dprinted look and feel and the possibilities are endless.

Today, I print incredible light shades and unseen jewelry. In regular 3D printing you want real smooth surfaces, in infill only 3D printing, you fiddle with patterns and densities to create unexpected products. The same model can and will appear in many different looks and feels. The possibilities are endless, the ‘torture’ never stops and I like it.
Four years ago, I was just a normal guy. Today, I am a 3D-designer/ manufacturer of light systems and jewellery. Wanna see more? Visit my Instagram account: @prdcz

INFIIL ONLY BRACELETS

DoubleThrill

This weekend opqrstu3D designed & printed ‘DoubleThrill’. I am doing experiments in ‘infill only’ 3dprinting for two years now and this is the print that says it all: ‘DoubleThrill’ really looks like it’s made of lace-like fabric. It’s not as thin as lace, but 0.9 mm comes close. It was a five and a half hour print job and took 12 meters white 3D4makers PETg. It’s printed at 0.3 mm layer height, 600 layers high. By going extreme, opqrstu3D arrived at this point and created an awesome light:

DoubleThrill © opqrstu 2017